Oil Sands Hoses

Oil Sands 

Expansion joints, barrels, hoses and pre-shaped bends for onshore oil sand fields. Our special reinforced rubber products have a much better resistance against the abrasive material than conventional and CCO metal piping, resulting in a much longer lifetime.

Construction

Trelleborg has developed a compound specially for oil sands coarse tailings which is resistant to high abrasion and bitumen, it is also cold resistant because of the harsh winters in the area where it is used. This compound is tested both in the laboratory and field. The compound has also been tested with an oil sands producer which has 5” rock in their tailings and hydro transport. For our reinforcement we only use cord layers of polyester or Kevlar depending on the pressure and application. We rubberize the cord layer in-house, which is unique, this means we have full control of our quality and supply. For the outer cover a UV-resistant compound was developed, also cold and bitumen resistant.

Dimensional Range / Options and Parameters

Straight hoses diameter range: ø 50 – ø 2200 mm. (ø2“ – 87“).

Preformed elbow diameter range: ø150 – ø 1000 mm. (ø6“ – 40“).

Straight hose length limits: 12.192 mm (40‘).

11.800 mm (38.7‘) standard length.

For shipment of a 40’ hose you will need a 45’ container, for shipment of our standard length you will need a 40’ container.


Oil sands applications:

  • Interstage reducing offset spools.
  • Tailings discharge spools.
  • Hydro transport Christmas tree T-joint spools.
  • 90 degree 5D tailings discharge elbows 24”.
  • Suction and discharge tailings booster applications.
  • Water inlet / shore connection hose.
  • Tailings pump connection applications.

Video

Expansion barrel

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